Forbidden Fruit

Here’s the thing about forbidden fruit:

There is always at least one; one car, one truck one bike that we can’t have. It doesn’t matter if it is a financial issue or a government issue.

BMWEngineAs you may have seen from my introduction a few days ago, I am a very large fan of BMW and their silky smooth straight six motors.  In my relatively short driving career I have had the pleasure of owning and wrenching on both the M52 2.8l motor as well the M54 3.0l lump.  Both are amazing in their own right, and it’s great to see the advancements in technology from one generation to the next. My favorite is the advancement from single Vanos (BMW’s fancy variable timing system) on the M52 to the double Vanos on the newer M54.

But the one iteration which has eluded me thus far is the grandest of them all the 3.2l 333hp S54 in the E46 M3.  This smooth six makes over 100hp/liter without the help of any forced induction or witchcraft, just six individual throttle bodies and a screaming 8,000rpm redline.

 

E46M3

Now some of you may say, “But Devlin, those are plentiful in the U.S. of A”, but in fact they are less rare than the 3 series I drive now. However, what we never got here was the final version, the mighty M3 CSL.

The CSL has the same 3.2l motor but modified to pump out out 360hp. And this newfound power is used to propel a car which is a few hundred pounds lighter than the standard M3, all thanks to a carbon fiber roof, and other weight saving items. These included thinner walled exhaust just to give you an idea of the engineering dedication that went into this car. And still no forced induction! Now that’s witchcraft.

 

So what is it about these cars that make them so desirable?  Is it simply the fact that we can’t have them, or is there more than that? Everyone has some sort of forbidden fruit, everyone from Bill Gates with his Porsche 959 to the numerous people who have already crossed into Canada to buy a 25 year old Nissan GT-R. So I ask you readers, what’s your forbidden fruit and why?

~ Devlin

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